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Tips and tricks

Figures, forms, faces

Tipps and tricks

I promised in the 2013/2 summer issue that I would show pictures taken in the winter season with similar themes. In this season we can also discover faces, figures, forms created by the ice, or sometimes by the snow.
These figures usually get in front of the lucky photographer's camera by chance, however, there are some methods to increase the chance of such encounters. One option is to comb through the flat ice formations of the silent section of stream banks or riversides (formations covered by the snow sometimes have to be revealed by a broom). Frozen puddles are even more promising: besides the air bubbles, the evaporation and the leaking of the under-ice water into the ground contribute to the creation of strange forms as well. Rime covering the ice surface enriches the formations as well at both sites.
Photo: © Árpád Krivánszky
Forest in snowfall
Canon EOS 5D Mark II. EF28-105mm f/3,5-4,5 f/8 1/250 s ISO 400
We will need a tripod and macro lens or extension tubes because these formations are often tiny. We also need to fit the focal plane to the ice surface.
There is a risk at these photos too that the photographer has a „vision” of something in the formation with too vivid fantasy which cannot be seen by the viewer. However, I hope that the artist hand of Nature creates clear figures too which make the dear viewer smile. Do we need any better prize?
A
I've got the first letter of the alphabet! Looking for the rest of them...
Indian head
I have already contacted with some American ethnographers to help me to identify the tribe of this Indian warrior…
Forest in snowfall
It's more astounding than funny: sometimes real landscapes can be formed on the frozen surface of a puddle, like this section of a forest in snowfall.
Land with black crescent of moon
I found this imaginary land on the surface of a frozen puddle, illuminated by a black crescent of moon to make it more interesting.
Photo: © Árpád Krivánszky
Animal head
Canon EOS 30D EF80-200mm f/2.8L f/29 1/13 s ISO 100
Ha-ha, the clown said
He has a charming smile!
Woman figure
We can find figures by the faster flowing sections of the streams too, however, these are not long-lasting due to the melting effect of the water. This woman figure can even be the spirit of the stream. To capture the ripples of the water, using shorter shutter speed is the most advisable, but payattention to the focal plane even more carefully.
Mask
The ice of the river hides not only nice and smiling forms, but it sometimes evokes the frightening figures of sci-fis and thrillers.
Watch out, danger of frost!
The snowstorm drew three exclamation marks around the patterns cut into the board fence.
The nature photographers? – They've gone that way!
This is what the forefinger of the pine tree shows.
Moor Frog
Some part of the thin ice at a slower flowing section of the stream show the figure of a moor frog. The similarity is increased by the reflecting sky which evokes the blue nuptial clothing of the male frogs. The long shutter speed eliminates the ripples of the water, driving the viewer's attention to the main theme.
Photo: © Árpád Krivánszky
Watch out, danger of frost!
Canon EOS 30D EF28-105mm f/3,5-4,5 f/5 1/30 s ISO 100
Woman with bun
The colour of the ice formations is usually modest, however, sometimes the ground shows through the ice and can nicely colour the picture. Next to the woman figure with bun looking to the left we can notice a smaller figure, showing a predator with its body stretched out.
Head in Picasso style
The thin ice near the bank can contain hundreds of air bubbles and the clear water can show the stones of the riverbed too. Besides the curved lines, the cracks caused by the waves create straight lines and make the picture look like a modern piece of art.
Hobo with his dog
Fight for the position of the alpha male. The hobo and his dog stare each other down, their noses nearly touch.
Animal head
The identification of the species is under process; we likely bumped into a peaceful herbivore.
Text and pictures: Árpád Krivánszky
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